andrew Jackson: Most Influential Presidents of our Time

was no deep thinker, but his matured policy positions did bespeak a coherent political philosophy. Andrew Jacksons Era of the Common Man or the Jacksonian Period (1824-1845) starts at his inauguration, and ends as the Civil War begins. He was a newfound American hero, and this pushed his political ambitions towards the White House. And in many ways, quarrels about honor obsessed his presidency. He was a smoldering latrine fire of resentments and rage. Jackson demonized buisness Managment many of those who crossed him, including John. To admirers he stands as a shining symbol of American accomplishment, the ultimate individualist and democrat. Was he a strict constructionist or a federal-power expansionist?

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andrew Jackson: Most Influential Presidents of our Time

Calhoun, Henry Clay, Bank of the United States president Nicholas Biddle, and Cherokee Indian chief John Ross. Deeply concerned that the office of president not be my Dad Is An Alcoholic seen as that of a monarch, but as one of the people, Washington insisted he be called "Mr. After becoming a national hero, Andrew Jackson wanted to further his career in politics. When South Carolina began threatening secession, Jackson told a South Carolinian, "If a single drop of blood shall be shed there in opposition to the laws of the United States, I will hang the first man I can lay my hand on engaged in such. Like Jefferson, he believed republican government should be simple, frugal, and accessible. These issues came to a head, when Vice-President Calhoun, in the South Carolina Exposition and Protest of 1828, supported his home state in nullifying the federal tariff of 1828, which implied he supported the Nullification Rights of the state. This incident protected the common man, by making it clear that the differing views of a minority will not be able to hurt the common man, so long as the Union can be preserved. Andrew Jackson left a permanent imprint upon American politics and the presidency. He cherished the extinction of the national debt during his administration as a personal triumph. The Maysville Road and Bank vetoes stood as enduring statements of his political philosophy. Jackson strongly fought this ideal, saying that the federal government was made to protect and represent the common man, even when the common man turned on one another, and to protect the common man the Union must be persevered.