peer Pressure On College Students

and non-drinkers) will give in to peer pressure in hopes to be socially accepted and have a successful transition to college. Although peers may be an essential coping mechanism during this transitional period, the increase of peer involvement in a students everyday life may influence the increase of peer pressure as well. Therefore, it is imperative to understand peer pressure, as well as which groups of college students are more susceptible to it, in order to decrease these negative consequences from occurring. Peers act as an influential model by introducing, providing, or pressuring risky activities (i.e., alcohol use) to other peers (Kinard Webster, 2010). The last portion of the researchers statement has to do with perceived realities. Again, it's important to reflect on what you think is important, your values, and who you want. Related: 51 single-serve recipes that you dont have to share with your roommate. They will probably see you the most, america the greedy interact with you the most and consequently, influence you the most, even unconsciously. Greek parties are often associated with heavy and pervasive drinking. What's more, college may be a time when you are away from home and family with more freedom to make your own choices than before. The social identity theory may help to explain why college students are influenced by peer pressure (Regan Morrison, 2011).

Parent and peer influences on alcohol involvement among recent high school graduates. No the Leadership of Civil Rights Movements one wants to feel left out in their own home. The same is true of alcohol. Are social norms the best predictor of outcomes among heavy-drinking college students? Peer Pressure and Alcohol Use amongst College Students by Josephine. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 29, 163-182. Similar to modeling, perceived drinking norms influence a college students level of drinking through the observation and comparison of their peers drinking levels. This can be your coworkers, your classmates, your friends or your roommates. These can be active efforts to get you to try something or passive efforts. Also, college-age students sometimes come in with unrealistic expectations, like making the best friends of their life, and that can cause some anxiety. You can ask others to stop these behaviors, or you can choose to avoid spending time with people who act in these ways.

Peer Pressure On College Students
peer Pressure On College Students