the History of D - Day

beaches, British and Canadian troops under Montgomery met less initial resistance and moved a mile or so inland. To make up for the shortfall, the Germans planted a million mines, laid mile upon mile of barbed-wire, and installed thousands of jagged underwater obstructions designed to rip holes in the hulls of landing craft. It was not just the invasion of Europe that the dukw was confined to- they were also successfully used in Allied operations in the Pacific Theatre and Sicily. At Omaha, American troops were pinned down amid withering cross fire from Germans perched along high cliffs located at either end of the beach. By nightfall, over 150,000 Americans, British and Canadians had come ashore against all odds, amid 9,000 casualties. Students staying on a residential at the historic Chteau du Baffy can visit the nearby landing beaches, plus memorials and museums.



the History of D - Day

D - day proved to be one of the most powerful invasions in history since it was a monolithic turning point of World War.
74th Anniversary of, d, day - the history of the, chteau du Baffy during wwii.
On the week of the 74th anniversary of, d, day we look at the Chteau.

the History of D - Day

The British and Canadians overcame light opposition to capture beaches codenamed Gold, Juno and Sword, as did the Americans. It was said that the bombing would be so loud that you had to scream to be heard. The chateau was used as a commune for all alliances. Within a week, a half-million men had landed and the five landing beaches were linked together as a unified front. Two things then happened. It was this versatility that made the dukw perfect for the planned Allied invasion of Europe, and on June 5/6 1944, the dukw entered into military history as the primary method of transport used by the armies involved in the Normandy landings. By dawn of D-Day, the greatest seaborne invasion force ever assembled was slowly approaching the Normandy Coast, taking the German soldiers there by surprise. Many of the officers brought with them tea, chocolate, cigarettes and soap. By dawn on June 6, thousands of paratroopers and glider troops were already on the ground behind enemy lines, securing bridges and exit roads. Roosevelt decided to press forward anyway, gambling that he could get his troops off the beach and dash inland via the small road before the Germans could reposition themselves for a counter-attack. The following account of the chateau during wwii is translated from eye-witness accounts, and tells a little of its story.

the History of D - Day