a Far Cry from Africa

poem, a Far Cry from Africa belongs to post colonial poetry. And although the issues of Walcotts A Far Cry from Africa are culturalare concerned with peopleanimals materialize throughout the poem in generally two ways. The poet appears to condemn such an attitude by comparing the Mau Mau Uprising to the Spanish Civil War (1936-39). In this powerful image, coming to the penultimate point of the poem, Walcott says basically that everybody dances, everybody gets emotionally intoxicated with the egoism of taking sides, everybody in that kind of situation is listening to a drumbeat of some kind or another. Again brutish necessity wipes its hands Upon the napkins of a dirty cause, again A waste of our compassion, as with Spain, The gorilla wrestles with the superman. Lines 26-33 This stanza is a change of scene from primarily that of Africa, to that of the poet. Lucia, a lovely island with a fairly low economy, would like to believe that Africa is just as paradisial and peaceful as the West Indies. The word brutish comes from the Latin brutus, meaning heavy, inert, and stupid; it most commonly refers to beasts. Corpses are scattered through a paradise. We have to concentrate on the poem and on what happens in the poem.

a Far Cry from Africa

A Far Cry from Africa by Derek Walcott - Poems



a Far Cry from Africa

Colonialism of Africa, Growing up In Africa, Mankind and Nature in Out of Africa,

The title also seems to say, well, look, this is a far cry from the Africa that I have been reading about in descriptions of gorgeous fauna and flora and interesting village customs. This is a controversial metaphor, indeed: likening African tribal people to pesty insects sucking the blood out of Africa. Instead of a light ruffling, there is the loud Threshed by beaters, the long rushes break. Walcott has won numerous awards: in 1965 he received the. The anthology Modern African Poetry (1984 edited by Gerald Moore and Ulli Beier, includes the Story, A Child Called It, by David Pelzer poems by 64 poets from twenty-four African nations, including three poets from Kenya of the same generation as Walcott. The violence of beast on beast is read 15 As natural law, but upright man Seeks his divinity by inflicting pain. There were many stories of Mau Mau violence directed at whites, the animals owned by whites, and at other Kikuyus who refused to join Mau Mau. Walcott lashes out at both sides of the Kenyan situation from a position in which he strongly and intensely believes that human and animal are not only different but should be regarded at least as absolute opposites. The violence of beast on beast is read. In sum, then, a loose rhyme scheme for two stanzas is present, but none for the other two. 10 Threshed out by beaters, the long rushes break In a white dust of ibises whose cries Have wheeled since civilizations dawn From the parched river or beast-teeming plain.



a Far Cry from Africa

A Far Cry From Africa by Derek Walcott.A wind is ruffling the tawny pelt.
Africa, kikuyu quick as flies Batten upon the bloodstreams of the veldt.
Corpses are scattered through.
A Far Cry from Africa by Derek Walcott deals with the theme of split identity and anxiety caused by it in the face of the struggle in which the poet could side with neither party.
A Far Cry from AfricaDerek Walcott 1962Author BiographyPoem TextPoem SummaryThemesStyleHistorical ContextCritical OverviewCriticismSourcesFor Further Study Source for information.