invention of Telephone

another room. If he could do that, he believed, he was very close to sending the human voice through that same circuit. The first commercial touch-tone phones were a big hit in their preview at the 1962 Seattle World's Fair. 1947 cellular telephone service conceived.H. Death: August 2, 1922, at Baddeck, Nova Scotia, Canada. As the voice-driven membrane causes the rod to advance and retreat into and out from the liquid, ever so slightly, the circuit resistance will alternately increase and decrease in perfect step with those vocal sounds. Despite its improvements, Picturephone was still big, expensive, and uncomfortably intrusive. Alexander Graham Bell Alexander Graham Bell of Scotland is commonly credited as the first inventor of the telephone. Differently from other pioneers of the telephone, such as Charles Bourseul, Philipp Reis, Innocenzo Manzetti and others, he did not think about transmitting voice by using the principle of the telegraph key (in scientific jargon, the "make-and-break" method but he looked for a "continuous" solution. It was like a patent application with a description of an invention and drawings, but without claims.

Invention of the telephone - Wikipedia



invention of Telephone

In that year, Johann Philip Reis (1834-1874) in Germany is said to have built a simple apparatus that changed sound to electricity and back again to sound. The mobile telephone was invented by Bell Telephone Company and introduced into New York City police cars in 1924. ON THE WEB: Alexander Graham Bell's Path to the Telephone Development was funded, in part, by a grant from the History and Philosophy of Science program of the National Science Foundation. Though others worked toward development of the telephone, it would be inappropriate to minimize Bell's contribution to the development of telephony. Said she was so lonesome she had been taking a bath three times a day in hope that the phone would ring." - Marshall McLuhan, 1964 HOW IT works: How a Telephone. In order to continue the experiment without hurting his patient, Meucci covered the copper wire with a piece of paper. He used to give his patients two conductors linked to 60 Bunsen batteries and ending with a cork.