cultural Barriers within Healthcare

to clarify expectations (Kaplan., 1989). While it is often assumed that hospital staff trained as medical professionals in their own countries would be ideal interpreters, this is not always the case. Establishing communica-tion enables all parties in a health encounter to participate in the exploration of the illness or condition, and to determine together what aspects of the "culture" of both patient and provider must be considered in diagnosis and treatment. Journal of General Internal Medicine, 14, 547-550. There is a high risk this groups low health literacy may go unnoticed. Woloshin,., Bickell,. There is evidence from the social and behavioural sciences of variability in reporting symptoms and interpretation of health among different linguistic and ethnic groups. One case, Anan.

cultural Barriers within Healthcare

A retrospective case review was undertaken of all Asian Canadian adolescent admissions to one Calgary hospital. X., Austin,., Johnson,. Training of service providers in working with interpreters is an essential component of cultural competence training, and should be a part of all health curricula. J Psychiatry, 132, 197-199. Latino patients who completed the questionnaire in Spanish were classified as Spanish-speaking. They often report stress and discomfort (Affiliation of Multicultural Societies and Services Agencies of BC, 2000).