a Story About Emily Grieson

as contextual light. Over the course of Faulkners A Rose for Emily, Miss Emilys erratic and idiosyncratic behavior becomes outright bizarre, and the reader, like the townspeople in the story, is left wondering how to explain the fact that Miss Emily has spent years living and sleeping with. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1987. It is also at this time that Miss Emily begins to avoid contact with others and other psychotic symptoms become evident.

A Story About Emily Grieson
a Story About Emily Grieson

Perhaps more tellingly, Miss Emily insisted to the visitors that her father was not dead" (Faulkner 2162). Due to this attitude of Miss Emily's father, Miss Emily was not able to develop any real relationship with anyone else, but it was like her world revolved around her father. Yet by the storys conclusion, the reader can go back through the narrative and identify many episodes in which Miss Emilys character and behavior hinted at the possibility of a mental illness, even if the town wanted to deny this fact and leave her intact. The narrator observes that after her fathers death and her subsequent breakdown, Miss Emily was sick for a long time though he does not offer more specific details as to the type of illness that she suffers (Faulkner 2162). Reference Copied to Clipboard. At first she cannot accept the death of her father. Once again, the pharmacist, representing the town as a whole, finds this request odd, but does not challenge. Among the numerous variables that a clinician considers are the patients prior history. The townspeople avoid confronting Miss Emily about any important concerns, such as the terrible smell that is emanating from her home, which itself is becoming more detached, superseded, and forbidding" (Stone 87) every day. Her father, charged with transmitting these traditions and values to Miss Emily, was rigid in reinforcing these expectations, and in the words of the narrator, the father was a man who had thwarted her womans life so many times" (Faulkner 2164). A Certain Morbidness: A View of American Literature. "None of the young men were quite good enough for Miss Emily and such.