on First Looking into Chapman

His men stand about him in silent awe, looking "at each other with a wild surmise." Their imaginations are flooded by a bewildering variety of guesses as to what lies beyond the horizon, new Americas perhaps, filled with gold and fabulous jewels and untold possibilities. But upon reflection, Keats told Clarke the line was bald, and too simply wondering and so he substitued Yet did I never breathe its pure serene before publication in book form. And to work we went, turning to some of the famousest passages, as we had scrappily known them in Popes version.

On First Looking into Chapman
on First Looking into Chapman

This seventh line troubled Keats. Unity and coherence are assured tHE DIFFERENCES IN THE FOUR GOSPELS not only by carrying the idea of discovery all the way through the poem, but also by using the linking words "Much" and "Oft" to begin the two halves of his octave and the word "Then" to begin his sestet. Chapman supplied us with many an after-treat; but it was in the teeming wonderment of this his first introduction, that, when I came down to breakfast the next morning, I found upon my table a letter with no other enclosure than his famous sonnet,. Bookmark this page, summary, keats has wide experience in the reading of poetry and is familiar with Homer's. "On first looking into Chapmans Homer by John Keats" a February 8, 2015. Lookd at each other with a wild surmise. His strong hands hanging downe, and all with froth.



on First Looking into Chapman

The first four lines of "Chapman's Homer" are a statement of the experience he has already had as a reader of poetry: "Much have I travell'd in the realms of gold. John Keats' "On First Looking into Chapman's Homer" is about that same moment of inspiration. It's about being captivated by something amazing and pushed by it to create something amazing yourself. A summary and analysis of a classic John Keats poem.